Photography as a business – dream vs reality part 3

Wedding photographer for Suffolk
Mum pins her Son’s button hole in place on his wedding day.

This is part 3 in my series of blogs about wedding photography as a business  – dream vs reality. So it all makes sense I recommend you start at part 1.

I will share what I have learned about the reality of being self employed for the first time in my life and the practicalities of earning a living from wedding photography.

Here in Part 3 I am going to write about my “learning” experiences in relation to being a “recommended supplier”, advertising on venue magazines/DVDs/USB keys and wedding fairs.


Carrying on from part 2, I was approached by one venue with a view to me buying advertising space at the end of a DVD they were producing to distribute to potential Brides. There were going to be four spaces for wedding photographers with a similar number for wedding transport, videographers, cake makers, Masters of Ceremonies, chair cover suppliers, DJ’s, florists and so on.

Now the venue was currently running 60 weddings per year but they were initially aiming to increase that to 80.  So you might think, 4 photographers, 80 weddings. That’s 20 each. Wow. That’s pretty good!

As always, the reality is very different. Now I know this isn’t a scientific study but I have done a bit of investigation on this one because advertising on this particular DVD required a substantial investment on my part.

By looking at the number of bookings I’m getting where I’m NOT a recommended supplier and from feedback from clients who HAVE booked me, from chatting to venue  “wedding organisers” I’ve got to know over the years and colleagues who HAVE gone down this advertising route, I reckon I’m being generous when I say 50% of the couples (so for this venue that’s 40 couples IF they make their target of 80) will not use the venue’s recommended suppliers.

You then have to realise that, with all the advertisements being shown right at the end of the DVD, not all the couples who watch the DVD promoting the venue will then sit and watch the adverts for all the recommended suppliers afterwards. I wouldn’t be surprised if only 50% bothered to. That means the potential client list has now gone down to 20.

20 Clients divided by 4 photographers, 5 each. Personally, I think that’s a much more realistic expectation. They wanted to charge me £2000 plus VAT to advertise on the DVD. That’s a cost to me of £500 per wedding client.

Now if I had a really large “advertising budget” and charged several thousands of pounds for my services, that may be affordable. To me and I suspect the majority of “start ups”, it’s simply too expensive. On what I charge, I would be working just to cover the advertising costs. Or to put it another way, I would be working for nothing!

You can see why it’s good business for the venue. 4 photographers, 4 videographers, 4 florists, 4 wedding transport providers, 4 DJ’s, 4 chair cover suppliers, 4 cake makers and so on all paying to be on the DVD. It adds up to a substantial amount of revenue.

To me, the unfair thing is all these providers have to allow for that overhead when they set their fees. This cost then gets passed on to the couple, their clients, who end up indirectly paying a lot more for the privilege of using that venue without even realising it!


Here’s another example of advertising. I was approached by a Town Council. They held weddings in their Town Hall and other council owned premises. In this age of “cut backs” they had decided to raise revenue by charging “recommended suppliers” ( here we go again, prepared to “recommend” suppliers they no absolutely nothing about ) a fee for each booking they received at a council owned premises as a result of their “recommendation”.

Now as businessmen and women, we should build an element into our fees to cover “advertising”. It’s good business practice to do so. Also, on the face of it, it makes good business sense for the council and the residents they represent to raise money where they can in the current economic climate.

The issue I had with it is simple. It was the amount they wanted to charge me just to include my business details in a leaflet. ( Yes, that was all it boiled down to. Include my details in a leaflet they give to couples ). Remember, this is a fee I would have to pay for each booking. I would have had to increase my charges by £300 per wedding just to cover their fees.

Now I did ask, can I have 2 price lists then. One for council weddings and one for all the others, just so that my clients realise that I am collecting £300 from them on your behalf! Needless to say, they would require me to sign a contract which would forbid me from pointing this out.

I’m not against venues making something out of “recommending” suppliers, I guess it make good business sense for them to do so. After all, they need to make a profit in order to continue trading.

What I am against is the amount they try to make out of wedding vendors ( not just photographers ) for very little work on their part. Then when you get potential clients see you and question why you charge so much, you can’t tell the clients “well, £300 of my fee is going straight to your venue for recommending me!”

I would emphasise, not all venues do this. Some photographers have worked long and hard cultivating relationships with venues and their wedding organisers in order to get on the “recommended suppliers” list. To me, that’s how it should be done and they deserve every booking they get.


A few years ago I was approached by an advertising company who were selling advertising space on a “USB key” that was going to be distributed at wedding fairs and at the Registrar’s Office for the same Council I mentioned above.

I checked with the Town Hall and spoke to someone who confirmed that yes, that company was selling advertising on a USB key on behalf of the Town Council and yes, that USB key would be distributed at wedding fairs and at the Registrar’s Office in the town centre. The “Council” were “enthusiastically supporting this initiative to help local businesses”. Surely if the Council are supporting it, it must be all good and my investment would be safe.

I paid several hundred pounds for said advertising and waited to see how my advert came out on the USB key. It never materialised. To cut a long story short, the advertising company went out of business and the Town Council simply didn’t want to know. After the advertising company failed, their attitude changed. They stated the company was “authorised” to act on the Town Council’s behalf, but the Town Council were not responsible for the failure of the company to produce the product I had paid for. Lesson learned, be very careful !! It appears you can’t even trust your local Council to act honourably.


I’m not saying that you should never invest in advertising ( I realise that’s what you might be thinking after reading about my experiences ).

I’m just trying to make you aware of the dangers. When starting out and thinking about advertising for the first time, it’s easy to get drawn in by the “sales talk” of those selling the advertising. Remember, they are selling you a product, not doing you a favour ( you’re doing them one ). Do your homework to the best of your ability and only spend money you can afford to lose.


On to wedding fairs. Be selective. They can be very expensive for very little return. Having spoken to others who have been in business a lot longer than me, it appears the emphasis on wedding fairs has changed over recent years.

In the past, a venue would organise a fair and invite trusted traders along with a view to attracting couples to their venue so the couple would have their wedding there.

Nowadays wedding fairs are being organised not just at wedding venues but also at random other places like village halls, with the organisers making their money by selling table space. The emphasis therefore is now on making money out of the traders rather than attracting engaged couples to the venue.

Nowadays I think you find there are just such a lot of wedding fairs being held all over the place that you have to check there aren’t too many nearby ON THE SAME DAY! Just take a look in the back of those “free” wedding magazines they give away at fairs and you will see for yourself there are simply too many of them.

They vary a lot in quality as well. You can usually tell the good ones by the fact that they are very difficult for photographers to get into. They will limit the number of photographers to just three of four ( at the larger fairs, less at smaller ones ). It’s no good going to a fair with too many photographers. Potential clients will be put off by the fact the wedding fair has been turned into a photography fair!

The thing with wedding fairs is, I am yet to find a “magic” solution. I have attended “large” ones where I haven’t had much interest and attended small ones where I have been really pleasantly surprised with the result. If someone reading this blog knows the magic solution to being successful at wedding fairs, please pass it on!!


If you want to try your hand at wedding fairs you will need a roll up banner and some leaflets/brochures to hand out.

Don’t buy too many brochures. If you are only going to hand them to clients who show an interest in what you are offering ( that’s what I do. I don’t “pounce” on every poor unsuspecting couple that walk past my stand like I’ve seen some do ), you will not need thousands of them.

Yes buying in bulk makes the cost of each brochure cheaper at the printers. Trouble is, next year your work will have improved and the brochure has your “older” work on it. Trust me, you’ll end up throwing the old brochures away which means you have wasted more money than you saved by buying in bulk!


I hope you are finding these blogs informative and useful but the old “word count” is getting high again ( up to nearly 1800 ) so I’ll end here for now. In the next part I will talk about how I decided how much much to charge for my  photography services and some issues around supplying wedding albums.

Hope to see you soon.

wedding photographer for Essex
The Bride and Groom on their wedding day in Colchester Castle Park.

Part 4

Back to part 2